Wednesday, March 12, 2008

Fighting the Blues

Michael Gilleland, who writes one of the blogs that I enjoy, wrote a post earlier in the week called "Pills to Purge Melancholy" that reproduced Sydney Smith's Letter to Georgiana Morpeth (February 16, 1820) which contains 20 tips to combat melancholy. The essay is full of good advice for instance: live as well as you dare, read amusing books, be as busy as you can, see as much as you can of those friends that like and respect you, and my personal favorite Be as much as you can in the open air without fatigue. Read Michael's post for all twenty.

Then later in the day, I read a post on SJ's Beat where she talked about some advice I gave her not very long ago (the advice included start a blog). We all have times when we need to get re-set. In the mountains, I am able to sort myself out. The hike up the mountain brings all the cares up to the surface and the wind at the top tosses them about and even blows some of them away, the hike down is when I figure out a new direction or how to deal with what's left. I loved reading the book Heidi when I was little and often when I hike in order to get emotionally strong again, I remember Clara going into the mountains to get well.

8 comments:

TheElementary said...

Your post reminded me why I like to walk. I think better when I'm walking and I haven't been for a good stroll in a very long time.
My Spouse has climbed Mount Fuji and says that he only ever met nice people on the way up and down. Mountains are special and they definitely heal and calm the mind.
What a soothing post. I feel closer to Spring already :)

mon@rch said...

The blues happens to all of us. I always enjoy walking and even if it isn't in the mountains, just being outside helps!

The Texican said...

I climbed atop my daughter's patio cover and was 23 feet above sea level. I felt marvelous. I could only walk about six feet in any direction without using the ladder again, but the exercise was exhilirating. I know what you mean. Walking is like moving into a third demension. I am so smart when I get back from a walk it is unbelieveable.

beckie said...

Even in the 1820's they knew freash air was the answer to a lot of problems.More people ought to do it more often! I spent the day outside working in the garden and it was wonderful!

bookbabie said...

It's seems to be that time of year. We've had a long winter here with just about everyone getting some type of "bug" by the end of it. We are starving for spring and I'm sure the first warm sunny day will wash away our blues:)

Crayons said...

I'm sure humans have fought the blues since the time of the Cro-Magnons. Animals get the blues, too. I know I do. What a good piece of advice: act like Heidi and Clara! Thanks for that.

Mary said...

The blues. They come. They go. I agree with your suggestion to "be outside". Walking a few miles a day never failed to reduce my stress/blues. I think about walking again every day lately...I need a boost, too.

Ruth said...

I like the 1820s letter and forwarded it to our psychologist at the hospital. I find that taking my patients outdoors helps them immensely. People have known that for thousands of years but our medical approaches sometimes neglect the simple cures.